Frequently Asked Questions

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Ink Wise™ improves everyday print performance by capturing the ink used in toner and inkjet cartridges more evenly on the surface of the paper.

• Sharper prints for laser and inkjet printers with no extra ink, toner or effort
• More defined black and vibrant colours
• A smoother and whiter sheet
• Quality double sided printing
• And of course, no paper jams

Ink Wise™ is trademarked by Australian Paper and exclusive to Reflex.

Yes, Ink Wise™ works on both Inkjet and Laser Printers with no changes to your printer settings required.

There are two main processes, depending on the end use of the pulp.

To make mechanical pulp, the wood is first chipped (a wood chip is typically about 50mm x 30mm x 5mm in size) and then the chips are fed through a refiner which disintegrates the chips into individual fibres, by forcing them between two large ribbed disks which counter-rotate at high speed, very close together. Often the chips are first softened by heating, or soaking the chips in caustic soda or other chemicals. Mechanical pulp is typically used in newsprint, magazine paper and paper towels. In mechanical pulping much of the lignin remains with the fibres.

 

To make chemical pulp, the woodchips are cooked with chemicals (e.g. caustic soda) to dissolve the lignin, leaving the cellulose fibres intact. The dissolved lignin is burnt to (a) provide energy, and (b) recover the chemicals. Chemical pulp makes stronger paper than mechanical pulp (which is why the most common process is called “kraft” – the German word for “strength”). Chemical pulp is thus important for packaging grades like bag and sack kraft and linerboard (for corrugated cardboard boxes).

 

Chemical pulp fibres are much more flexible and conformable than mechanical pulp fibres, so they are ideal for making fine papers (such as office paper) with excellent printing surfaces.

Paper can be made from most types of plant fibre, and some commercial products are manufactured partly or wholly from non-wood fibres such as cotton, flax, hemp, bagasse and kenaf. However, these products are only produced in relatively minor quantities by a few mills around the world.

 

Sometimes these fibres are used to make special purpose papers, because of their unusual properties; for example cotton for banknotes and other products requiring very high durability. Non-wood fibres are popular for use in hand-made papers.

 

Each type of non-wood pulp has its own set of challenges for use: competition with other crops, storage, pulp mill effluent treatment, and handling in the paper mill. They are not available in quantities or at a cost which is competitive with wood pulps.

 

Australian Paper monitors developments in this area, and we do manufacture some specialised products based on cotton linter fibres.

The ream wrappers Australian Paper uses for our office papers are constructed using a 60gsm paper base with a thin 15.9 gsm layer of plastic on the outside.  The gloss plastic layer acts as a barrier to protect the quality of the paper inside.  Paper will readily absorb moisture from the surrounding air.  Our office papers contain a moisture content of around 4.5% and this needs to remain constant for consistent performance through the feeding paths and high temperatures of office printers.  The exterior glossy layer also provides additional strength to keep the ream intact and protected.

 

Regarding the recycling of the paper component of the wrapper, our advice from Australia’s longest recycling providers is that their ability to partly recycle ream wrappers varies by recycling facility.  For more information, please contact your paper recycling service provider.  Overall, the ream wrapper represents less than 1% of the total weight of the product, which means that 99% of each ream of office paper is fully recyclable.

When light shines on the surface of paper, the light that gets reflected is what you see as its colour. Depending on the colour of the light source and the colour of the paper, the light you see forms a visible spectrum of colours from violet through indigo, blue, green, yellow, orange and red. Your eyes have complicated structures for interpreting colour. It is impossible to define the colour you see with one single figure for colour.

Whiteness is a calculated measure of light reflected from a surface across the visible spectrum. As whiteness is measured across all wavelengths of light you can see, it is intended to correlate better with your visual perception of paper. Papers that reflect a higher percentage of blue light tend to measure higher whiteness while those reflecting a higher percentage of yellow light measure lower.

CIE Whiteness, developed by the European CIE (International Commission on Illumination) is the most commonly used whiteness index. The CIE measure of whiteness is a measurement of light reflected by the paper across the visible spectrum when viewed under ‘daylight’.

 

The CIE have set a standard called ‘D65’ illumination which is a representation of outdoor daylight. Using this standard, most ‘white’ paper will have a CIE Whiteness measure of between 130 and 170 due to the addition of dyes and Optical Brightening Agents (OBAs). OBAs reflect light from the non-visible range (ultra-violet) back into the visible spectrum, increasing the apparent whiteness of paper.

All Reflex papers are acid free.  This ensures they meet the ISO 9706 Standard for Permanent Paper – and makes them ideal for scrapbooking and similar uses. The term acid free is typically applied to papers that have a pH that is neutral or alkaline, and is therefore not acidic. Ideally the papers also contain some additional alkalinity which protects against acid breakdown – this causes loss of strength and colour of the paper over time.

Premium Reflex Ultra White paper is mostly made up of hardwood pulp and water.  We also add pigments which improves the brightness, opacity and surface finish. Starch gives the paper strength, stiffness, reduces dusting and improves print quality.

  • Bleached pulp: approximately 72%
  • Ground calcium carbonate
  • (limestone): approximately 23%
  • Moisture: 4.5%
  • Starch: approximately 3.5%

In terms of actual measurements, the table below offers a guide to the most common paper sizes:

ISO A-Series Dimensions:
– A0 = 841mm x 1189mm
– A1 = 594mm x 841mm
– A2 = 420mm x 594mm
– A3 = 297mm x 420mm
– A4 = 210mm x 297mm
– A5 = 148mm x 210mm
– A6 = 105mm x 148mm

To ‘archive’ paper simply means to store it, and possibly refer to it, for a long period of time. For greater assurance, there is an international standard to define those paper properties which make paper suitable for storage for long periods.

 

The Permanent Papers Standard – ISO 9706 –  to which all Reflex papers (except Reflex 100% Recycled) conform, includes requirements for papers to be alkaline (‘acid free’) and low in lignin (‘lignin free’). Conformance to this standard assures that Reflex can be used as archival paper.

 

Neither the International Permanent Paper nor Archival Paper Standards define the length of time a paper can be stored. This is impossible to determine as it depends entirely how well the papers are looked after in storage.

In terms of actual measurements, the table below offers a guide to the most common paper sizes:

ISO A-Series Dimensions:
– A0 = 841mm x 1189mm
– A1 = 594mm x 841mm
– A2 = 420mm x 594mm
– A3 = 297mm x 420mm
– A4 = 210mm x 297mm
– A5 = 148mm x 210mm
– A6 = 105mm x 148mm